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FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT FOR ST. VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES FROM 6:00 P.M. TODAY UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

April 25, 2022

  

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

FLASH FLOOD WATCH IN EFFECT FOR ST. VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES FROM 6:00 P.M. TODAY UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

 

 

The National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO) is urging residents and motorist in low lying areas, areas prone to flooding, lahar or mudflows and landslide to be vigilant and exercise caution.

 

A Flash Flood Watch is in effect for St. Vincent and the Grenadines until further notice. According to St. Vincent and the Grenadines Meteorological Services, a low-level trough is encroaching on our islands, the upper-level environment is expected to become supportive. Consequently, cloudy to overcast skies, pockets of light to heavy showers, periods of light rain and isolated thunderstorms are anticipated across St. Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG) during the next few days. This activity could peak by midweek across the Southern Windward Islands including SVG. The latest forecast model guidance suggests rainfall accumulations of 75 – 125 millimeters (approximately 3-5 inches) with isolated higher amounts in mountainous areas during the next 24-72 hours.

 

A Flood-Watch is issued when conditions are favourable and there exists the possibility of flooding during the watch period. This Flash-Flood Watch may be upgraded to a warning if conditions warrant.

 

The National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO) urges all residents especially persons living near rivers and streams in areas such as Fitz-Hughes, Chateaubelair, Spring Village, Vermont, Buccament, Rose Place, Calliaqua, Belair, Dauphine, Arnos Vale, Marriaqua, Lowmans, Greggs, South Rivers, Dickson and Langley Park to be vigilant.

 

Residents in the red and orange volcano hazard zones are also reminded that lahar flows within the river system is also possible. Lahars are dense mixture of ash and water which usually occurs during heavy rain and creates dangerous mudflow that can destroy everything in its path as it rushes down the volcano’s slopes and rivers.

 

Residents and motorists are asked to continue to monitor and listen to updates from the SVG Met Services and to exercise extreme caution when traversing areas that are prone to flooding.  

 

 

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Volcanic Hazard Zones